Thursday, October 28, 2010

Setup private cloud computing on Cent OS Eucalyptus 2.0

Eucalyptus is software that implements scalable IaaS-style private and hybrid clouds. The Eucalyptus architecture is highly modular with internal components consisting of Web services, which make them easy to replace and expand. Eucalyptus' flexibility enables it to export a variety of APIs towards users via client tools. Currently Eucalyptus implements the Amazon Web Service (AWS) API, which allows interoperability with existing AWS-compatible services and tools. This also allows Eucalyptus users to group resources drawn both from an internal private cloud and external public clouds to form a hybrid cloud.



#yum install -y java-1.6.0-openjdk-devel ant ant-nodeps libvirt-devel curl-devel httpd httpd-devel apr-devel openssl-devel dhcp libxml2 libxml2-devel gnutls gnutls-devel xen-devel libgcrypt-devel zlib-devel perl-Convert-ASN1 perl-Crypt-OpenSSL-RSA perl-Crypt-OpenSSL-Random chkfontpath scsi-target-utils fuse-libs swig gcc ntp

First, make sure JAVA_HOME is defined. For example, on Centos 5:
export JAVA_HOME="/usr/lib/jvm/java-openjdk/"
export JAVA="$JAVA_HOME/jre/bin/java"
 
reboot server in xen-kernel


  • run system-config-securitylevel-tui
  • select Security Level: Disabled
  • select OK
 
#vi /etc/xend/xend-config.sxp
(xend-http-server yes)
(xend-unix-server yes)
(xend-unix-path /var/lib/xend/xend-socket)
(xend-address localhost)
(network-script network-bridge)
(vif-script vif-bridge)
(dom0-min-mem 196)
(dom0-cpus 0)
(vncpasswd '')
download from http://open.eucalyptus.com/downloads


aoetools-21-1.el4.i386.rpm

eucalyptus-walrus-2.0.0-1.i386.rpm
euca2ools-1.3-1.i386.rpm

euca-rampartc-1.3.0-1.i386.rpm


euca-axis2c-1.6.0-1.i386.rpm

lzo2-2.02-3.el5.rf.i386.rpm

eucalyptus-2.0.0-1.i386.rpm

perl-Crypt-OpenSSL-Random-0.04-1.el5.rf.i386.rpm


eucalyptus-cc-2.0.0-1.i386.rpm

perl-Crypt-OpenSSL-RSA-0.25-1.el5.rf.i386.rpm


eucalyptus-cloud-2.0.0-1.i386.rpm

perl-Crypt-X509-0.32-1.el5.rf.noarch.rpm


eucalyptus-common-java-2.0.0-1.i386.rpm

python25-2.5.1-bashton1.i386.rpm


eucalyptus-gl-2.0.0-1.i386.rpm

python25-libs-2.5.1-bashton1.i386.rpm


eucalyptus-nc-2.0.0-1.i386.rpm

vblade-14-1mdv2008.1.i586.rpm


eucalyptus-sc-2.0.0-1.i386.rpm

vtun-3.0.2-1.el5.rf.i386.rpm


#yum localinstall eucalyptus*


Now start up your Eucalyptus services. On the front-end: 



/etc/init.d/eucalyptus-cloud start
/etc/init.d/eucalyptus-cc start
On the node:
/etc/init.d/eucalyptus-nc start
At this point you should be ready to go through the first-time
configuration. 
Point your browser to, https://front-end-ip:8443 Since Eucalyptus is using a self-signed certificate, your browser is likely to prompt you to accept the certificate. On some machines it may take few minutes after the starting of the Cloud Controller for the URL to be responsive the first time you run Eucalyptus. You will be prompted for a user and password both of which are set to admin initially. Upon logging in the first time you will be asked to
  1. change the admin password,
  2. set the admin's email address, and
  3. confirm the IP of the Cloud Controller host.
    #mkdir $HOME/.euca
    #unzip euca2-admin-x509.zip -d $HOME/.euca 
    
    #. $HOME/.euca/eucarc
  4. 
    

    Adding Images

    To enable a VM image as an executable entity, a user/admin must add a root disk image, a kernel/ramdisk pair (ramdisk may be optional) to Walrus and register the uploaded data with Eucalyptus. Each is added to Walrus and registered with Eucalyptus separately, using three EC2 commands. The following example uses the test image that we provide. Unpack it to any directory: #wget http://open.eucalyptus.com/sites/all/modules/pubdlcnt/pubdlcnt.php?file=http://eucalyptussoftware.com/downloads/releases/euca2ools-1.2-centos-i386.tar.gz&nid=3088 #cd euca-centos-5.3-i386
    #euca-bundle-image -i  --kernel true
    #euca-upload-bundle -b  -m /tmp/.manifest.xml
    #euca-register /.manifest.xml
    Next, add the root filesystem image to Walrus: #euca-bundle-image -i #euca-upload-bundle -b -m /tmp/.manifest.xml #euca-register /.manifest.xml Our test kernel does not require a ramdisk to boot. If the administrator would like to upload/register a kernel/ramdisk pair, the procedure is similar to the above: #euca-bundle-image -i --ramdisk true #euca-upload-bundle -b -m /tmp/.manifest.xml #euca-register /.manifest.xml
    
    
    :)
Post a Comment